What are the requirements to qualify for a grazing classification?

Grazing valuation claims require proof of the presence of at least one animal unit on a parcel meeting minimum acreage requirements and proof that the livestock has access to all of the agricultural land for the tax year. It must also be demonstrated that the parcels have adequate features to support livestock (e.g., fencing, water sources, etc.). Proof may be in the form of grazing lease, a personal property declaration of livestock that graze on the land, or some other proof of grazing use. However, grazing must be the primary use of the land in order to qualify.

The NM Tax and Revenue Department issues an order each year specifying the carrying capacity for land in each county. Carrying capacities are typically stable and generally do not change from year to year. In Grant County, there are two classes of grazing land based on carrying capacities observed throughout the county. Class A grazing land can support 8 animal units per section (640 acres) and 80 acres (enough to support one animal unit) is the minimum amount of land required to receive the special method of valuation. Class B grazing land can support 12 animal units per section (640 acres) and 53.3 acres (enough to support one animal unit) is the minimum amount of land required to receive the special method of valuation.

One animal unit is defined as one cow or five sheep or five goats.

Show All Answers

1. What is the difference between wet and dry agricultural land?
2. What if there is an improvement (house) on the agricultural land?
3. What are the requirements to qualify for a grazing classification?
4. What does “agricultural products” mean?
5. Does the assessor’s office have the right to request income and expense information from a taxpayer who is applying for agricultural valuation?
6. How does the assessor determine whether the primary use of the land is agricultural?